Welcome?

If you have found this blog, saying Welcome does not really seem appropriate. I know you wish you weren't surfing the internet for diabetes. I felt the same.

A big part of me wishes I were not writing about diabetes, nor did I anticipate to become so opinionated or informed on the subject, but it happened. In 2010, my son was diagnosed with Type 1 Diabetes.

It wasn't really part of the plan… Correction - it was not part of the plan, but it happened. It is not always easy, but I think we are all doing okay, and I hope we continue to do so.

Why the Middle East? I happen to live in Dubai. I don't think that living in the Middle East makes mine or my son's diabetic experience any more unique or challenging than it does elsewhere in the developed world.

I hope you stick around, or read something you like. Feel free to comment and join the conversation, subscribe or follow this blog by liking the Facebook page Diapoint.

Please note: This blog does not give medical advice. I am opinionated, and I share my experiences, but the first rule of diabetes is to follow up with your doctor and/or nurse educator about your care, diagnosis or medication. If you do not have a medical practitioner that is helping you find your way through this crazy world, then do not give up until you find the right one.

Wednesday, November 30, 2016

Diabetes - More Than Just a Month of Blue Circles

As today is the last day of November, Diabetes Awareness Month, I had a different message prepared today. 

All month I have attended events, posted a fact a day and bombarded my social media with other things to raise awareness about diabetes. 

I wanted to highlight that many may be tired of my daily posts about diabetes. 

I wanted to highlight that this is okay because it is small in comparison to how often a diabetic has to consider the information I have shared over the last month.

I wanted to highlight that diabetes is more than a post, or internet meme you can scroll through and pick up a quick soundbite. 

It is more than walks and fundraisers. 

It is more than the smiling faces of the children you see representing research efforts. 

While many diabetics manage and live with diabetes every day, all day, to the fullest, they are too often reminded of how horrific this disease can be. 

This morning, I was sadly reminded once again. A beautiful young woman lost her life to diabetes last night. I do not know her personally, but I do know her face and her smile. I do know the disease that took her life too soon.  I am not sure of the circumstances of her case, but I do know that she was in DKA because of Type 1.

Please know the signs, symptoms and what to do in the event of a diabetic emergency. 

If you are diabetic, please consider all the risks and what you need to do to manage those.  

Please be more than aware.. 

Please know there are people out there fighting the other 335 days a year..






2 comments:

  1. This item has been referred to the TUDiabetes Blog page for the week of November 28, 2016

    ReplyDelete